purple diamond

Rarity and beauty of purple diamonds

 

As beautiful as they are rare, purple diamonds are not quite as scarce as true red diamonds but come a close second in rarity value. Unlike the red, purple diamonds are highly valued by consumers as well as investors and collectors. The glory and enchantment evoked by a purple diamond evoke a desire for ownership more than any other color of precious gems.

 

Symbols of Devotion and Passion

 

Purple diamonds represent majesty, magic and passion. Purple diamonds are known by the marketing terms of deep orchid; the flower-themed lilac, a fruity sounding grape or plum, a majestic mauve, as well as the ethereal lavender diamond. So as well as being a prized item in any diamond connoisseurs collection, purple diamonds are often used as tokens to show devotion and attachment in engagement and wedding rings as well as gifts between lovers.

 

Purple diamonds as the Holy Grail of diamond enthusiasts 

 

Purple diamonds are so rare that they are the holy grail of diamond collectors and enthusiasts around the world. Every collector strives to find the perfect purple diamond that will enhance and complete its diamond collection. But natural purple diamonds occur extremely rarely and gaining one is no easy feat.

 

While red diamonds are celebrated as being the rarest and most precious of all the colored diamonds, many dedicated diamond dealers and collectors will tell you that while they have handled a red diamond or had one pass through their dealerships. They have never even seen a purple diamond. From this, we can gauge how unique and rare true natural purple diamonds are. 

 

Natural true purple diamonds 

 

Purple diamonds gain their enticing color from the unusual amount of hydrogen in the molecular structure. The artificially enhanced purple may have had some synthetic color deepening techniques involved in its deep purple color. True and natural purple diamonds are extremely rare and much sought. Collectors may sometimes get gems verified as by the Gemological Institute of America to determine if it is natural or enhanced before buying.

 

A treasure trove of jewels

 

Colored diamonds, including the kingly purple, have been mined or discovered in many sites from Africa, to Russia to South America. But a majority of colored diamonds have been mined from that treasure trove of colored diamonds. This is the Argyle Mine in the Kimberly region of Western Australia. For nearly four decades it has proven itself as a regular supplier of the majority of colored diamonds mined in the world. It has produced more than 12 carats of purple diamonds during its operations. This mine is slated to be closed in 2020, and this will decrease the worldwide supply of diamonds. It is projected that this decline in supply will soon cause a rapid increase in the value of already staggeringly valuable colored diamonds.

 

Value of purple diamonds

 

Purple diamonds are usually valued at a wide range of prices depending on the purity of the color stone. The deepest most vivid purple stone is the rarest of its kind and is also the most expensive. This is the rare true purple diamond, and it is practically impossible to get one of these as they are found so infrequently. 

 

Most of the diamonds that are sold as purple are not true purple but actually diamonds that have overtones of differing colors. They have been subjected to color treatment techniques to enhance and vitalize color.

 

Diamonds of fainter shades or with secondary colors, for example, a pink-purple or purplish-brown will cost less than pure purple. The cheapest form of purple diamonds will have been treated to intensify color. Buyers of diamonds usually consult with precious stone experts before committing to a sale to avoid color-treated diamonds.

 

Even at their cheapest, the prices for lighter, color treated or differently shaded purple diamonds may be anything from around ten thousand dollars onward with the price increase based on size, weight, color and cut of the stone. Meanwhile, the pure natural deep purple can sell for hundreds of thousands to more than a million depending on its color, size and cut. 

 natural purple diamond

 

Famous purple diamonds

 

Larger size diamonds rarely come to light when dealing with more precious colored diamonds such as the red and the purple. In fact, many of the stones of these colors are smaller than even one carat. That being said, the most famous stones of any color are also often the largest examples of that kind.

 

The most famous purple diamonds include the fancy vivid Royal Purple Heart Diamond. This was found in Russia and was cut by the Julien Klein Corporation into a gorgeous heart that retains its awe-inspiring 7.34-carat size while showcasing its intense beauty. 

 

The Supreme Purple Star diamond exists in secrecy. All the public knows about this diamond is that it is from two to five carats and reflects different shades of purple from its multiple facets. Its value is estimated to be as high as twenty million though both owner and origin remain a mystery.

 

The Argyle violet diamond is another example of the majesty and glory that purple diamonds embody. It was found in the Argyle mine in 2016 at a whopping 9.17 carat rough. This was reduced in the polishing process to a 2.83-carat oval-shaped diamond.

 

The Purple Orchid was a four-carat rough diamond originating from South Africa. It took the diamond enthusiasts by storm during the 2014 Hong Kong gem show. There it dazzled after being processed over months to reveal its inner magnificence. Its asking price was set at one point two million per carat, giving it a value of four million dollars at that auction.

fancy-purple-diamond

Conclusion

 

Valued as much for their rarity as their beauty and costing more than fifty times as much as clear diamonds, purple diamonds are a must-have in any diamond collectors portfolio. What’s more is that purple diamonds are a known as a symbol of passion and coveted as a display of majesty. Their elusiveness makes their ethereal and ancient beauty all the more sought after. With a surging demand that cannot be satisfied, the allure and value of purple diamonds will continue to increase as time goes by.